Is it possible to dig a 0.5 miles hole in the ground?

I read somewhere that ground temperature rises below ground surface, it rises round 1°C per 30 meters, and with 0.5 miles it will be round +20°C, which is like 50°C...
That could be used for thermal energy...
Does anyone know anything about this?
Nenad
Asked Feb 24, 2013
Half a mile (.5 miles) would be 2,640 feet. The world record for drilling depth is 31,441 feet, almost six miles, so it is surely possible to drill to that depth. The problem is that it takes so much energy to pump and distribute the warmer water/air that it detracts from the temperature advantage.

In areas like Iceland where there is a high concentration of volcanoes, geothermal energy is used to provide heat for everything including buildings, water and even roads. The geothermal advantage based on depth alone isn't that great however because the deeper the hole, the more expensive it is to drill and pump.
Rob
Answered Feb 24, 2013
Edited Feb 24, 2013
There is no need for pump, since if water gets hot it will solely go up since it's lighter than cold water... That way, if cold side is protected from earth heat and hot side have like radiator that will warm the water and move it up...
Same thing is used in every home bathroom water heater...

In my areas it have natural thermal sources, but to buy place like that you need like 2 million $, and temperature is 80°C ( 176°F )...
I don't say that drilling wouldn't cost, but it will pay off after few years...
To heat water using wood you need at least 300$ / winter, and if temperature gets to 50°C ( 122°F ) you can make even electricity of it...

Drill machine - min. 500$
Electric cable - min. 700$
Water cable - min. 1000$x2
Total: 3200$, max. 5000$...
And this system can save 500-1000$ a year... So in 5-10 years it will pay off...
Nenad Feb 24, 2013

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