Why does water have a boiling point of (100c) and freezing point (0c)

why does water have a boiling point of (100c) and freezing point (0c) as compred to carbon tetrachloride which has a boling point of 77c and a freezing point of -23c
kevjanean
Asked May 04, 2010
When William Thomas invented the Kalvins, he specifically wanted a measurement of temperature that is even at both freezing and boiling points., that's why.
Oni_Kami
Answered May 04, 2010
water at 0c is the point where it changes into the state of being a solid and when it is at 100c the water turns into steam, its gaseous state. those two temperatures are just when water turns into its other states of matter.
night_angel
Answered Jul 08, 2010
To the best knowledge of mine, the temperature at which a liquid's vapor pressure is equivalent to the atmospheric pressure is known as boiling point and the temperature at which any liquid exerts no vapor pressure is to be considered as freezing point. Any way the temperature at which any substance start exerting vapor pressure is to be noted as melting point. However the melting point has got no definition yet.
krishna
Answered Dec 06, 2010

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