Whether there is pain while doing d$c?

i want to know about the pain during evacuation?
Anonymous User
Anonymous User
Asked Dec 25, 2009
i honstley dont know but sex cant be hard
Hmm.. Whats d$c?

if you mean D&E

During your D&E procedure, your doctor will give you antibiotics to prevent infection. You'll then be positioned on the table in the same position as for a pelvic exam: lying on your back with your feet in stirrups. The doctor will then use a speculum to open your vagina. Once your vagina and cervix are cleaned with an antiseptic solution, you'll be given an injection of paracervical block (a pain medication) in the cervical area as well as a sedative.

If your procedure is performed in a hospital operating room, you could receive an injection of anesthesia into your spine. Injection of anesthetic into the fluid surrounding your spinal cord numbs the area between your legs. Alternatively, you could be put under a general anesthetic, which means you will be asleep throughout the dilation and evacuation procedure.

The doctor will then grasp your cervix with an instrument designed to hold the uterus in place. Your cervix will then be dilated using probes of increasing size. An abortion performed during the second 12 weeks of pregnancy requires the cervix to be dilated more than is needed for a vacuum aspiration.

Once the cervix is sufficiently dilated, a thin, hollow tube called a cannula is passed into the uterus. The cannula is attached to a bottle and a pump. The pump provides gentle suction used to remove the pregnancy from the uterus.

A loop-shaped instrument called a curette is then used to gently scrape the endometrium (lining of the uterus) and remove tissue from the uterus.

Forceps are passed into the uterus to grasp larger pieces of tissue. The use of forceps is more likely in pregnancies of 16 weeks of more; this is done before the uterine lining is scraped with a curette.

Suction may be used as a final step to ensure all pregnancy contents are removed from the uterus. Tissue removed during a dilation and evacuation procedure is examined to ensure all pregnancy tissue was removed and that the abortion is complete. Your doctor may also perform an ultrasound during the procedure to confirm that all tissue was removed and that the pregnancy is ended.

A medication such as Vasopressin may be administered to reduce the amount of bleeding from the procedure.
figment
Answered Dec 26, 2009
I've had this procedure done, and it is called a D & C.
Dilatation and curettage, a minor operation in which the cervix is expanded enough (dilatation) to permit the cervical canal and uterine lining to be scraped with a spoon-shaped instrument called a curette (curettage).
I needed this procedure performed after my child was born; there was placenta that did not come out at birth.
It was completely painless for me; I was put under general anesthesia.
LilMama2010
Answered Jan 12, 2010
i too have had this done and it was totally painless for me- the dr. warns that there may be pain, but I think its only a precaution. it almost felt like I was starting my monthly- a little cramp once in awhile, but no pain.
virey
Answered Mar 01, 2010
this is desturbing
lily8762
Answered Mar 13, 2010
It's life bro and life's disturbing
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